Massachusetts truck crash statistics may seem somewhat startling at first, but the legal process provides options for victims harmed in a truck accident. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration states that, 3,921 people were killed in 2012 by large trucks. That same year, 104,000 people were injured by large trucks. In 2012, 333,000 big trucks were involved in truck accidents.

NHTSA statistics help shed some light on the number of injuries and fatalities caused by truck accidents. Truck accident related fatalities grew somewhat from 2011 to 2012. Of the total number of fatalities, more than 70 percent were occupants in other passenger vehicles and 10 percent were not. From 2011 to 2012, there was nearly a 20 percent increase in injuries caused by truck accidents. Of the truck accidents that resulted in injury, more than 70 percent were victims inside other vehicles, and three percent were not occupants of passenger vehicles.

Big rigs accounted for four percent of registered vehicles in 2012, three percent of automobiles involved accidents that produced injuries or property damage, and eight percent of automobiles involved in deadly accidents. According to statistics, big rigs are more susceptible to being involved in a deadly multi-vehicle accident than a fatal single-vehicle accident when compared to passenger vehicles. Unfortunately, due to the size difference between big rigs and passenger vehicles they share the roadway with, truck accidents can be catastrophic and result in catastrophic injuries and death. The damages victims may suffer may include extensive physical, emotional and financial damages.

Because of the damaging nature of truck accidents, victims of truck accidents and family members of victims of truck accidents, may have a variety remedies and resources available to them. Statistics shed light on the issue of truck accidents, however, each truck accident impacts victims and families which is why it can be both useful and important for victims to understand the protections available to them.

Source: U.S. Department of Transportation National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, “Large Trucks,” accessed on Sept. 9, 2014