Massachusetts residents know the dangers that go along with driving. For motorcyclists sharing the roads with cars, trucks and commercial vehicles, these hazards are amplified. A motorcycle accident can cause catastrophic injuries to a rider, which are often far more serious than those sustained others caught in the incident.

In a recent accident outside of Worcester, a 76-year-old man is alleged to have collided with a motorcyclist at an intersection. At this point, the driver fled the scene. Police reports indicate that the driver was stopped behind the motorcycle at a red light. When the light turned green, according to the driver, the motorcycle did not move. The driver, however, went forward and hit the bike from behind.

The driver said he blacked out shortly after the incident, so he doesn’t recall what happened next. Witnesses claim that the driver apologized to the motorcyclist, but also backed up over him at least one other time after the initial impact. The driver contends that he is unaware of what happened to the victim after the first contact. The motorcyclist suffered serious injuries and was transported to Massachusetts General Hospital. The driver faces criminal charges and had his driver’s license revoked.

For victims injured in this kind of accident, or family members who lose a loved one in a fatal motorcycle crash, compensation for harm caused by a negligent driver may be recovered through a personal injury or a wrongful death claim. If victims can prove that a negligent driver caused harm, they may be entitled to money damages.

Motorcycle accident victims may be entitled to compensation for reimbursement of out-of-pocket expenses, present and future medical bills, pain and suffering, emotional harm and other monetary damages. Whether the crash is the result of speeding or distraction, victims may find that they can work through the physical and economic challenges posed by a motorcycle accident by pursuing justice in civil court.

 

Source: Boston Globe, “Man, 76, charged in crash into biker,” Matt Byrne, Sept. 5, 2012