A motorcyclist in a nearby Massachusetts community recently lost his leg in a motorcycle accident. The accident occurred when a car pulled out in front of the motorcyclist, which caused the motorcycle rider to strike the car and a tree, severing his leg. The 45-year-old motorcycle accident victim was in intensive care following the accident and was expected to undergo multiple surgeries. In addition to the loss of his leg below the knee, the man also suffered scrapes and cuts and required stitches above his eye. An accident reconstruction team was called to the scene following the motorcycle accident. The crash remained under investigation and charges had not been filed immediately following the accident.

Motorcycle accident victims can suffer horrific injuries, which can result in serious disabilities and significant challenges following a motorcycle accident. Motorcycle accident victims may be left with substantial medical bills, the loss of the ability to work and frustrations associated with the aftermath of a motorcycle accident.

Because of the ongoing nature of the damages many motorcycle accident victims may face, resources are available to ensure they are properly compensated for the harm they have suffered when the harm was caused by a negligent party, such as a negligent driver. Motorcycle accident victims may be able to recover damages for medical expenses, lost wages and pain and suffering damages through a personal injury claim against the negligent driver responsible for their accident and responsible to them for their damages.

Because of the impact and disruption of a motorcycle accident on the lives of motorcycle accident victims, many resources are available to help victims through the recovery process and with the challenges they may face for the rest of their lives following a motorcycle accident injury. Motorcycle accident victims should be familiar with the legal actions available to them following a motorcycle accident.

Source: WickedLocal.com, “Brockton man loses leg from motorcycle crash,” Benjamin Paulin, March 10, 2016