Because of the generally vulnerable nature of motorcycle riders, motorcyclists can suffer sometimes catastrophic injuries following a motorcycle accident. One type of serious injury motorcycle riders may suffer is a spinal cord injury. If you or a loved one has suffered a spinal cord injury in a motorcycle, or other type of vehicle, accident, you may be searching for additional information about spinal cord injuries, their causes and what the future may look like following a catastrophic motorcycle accident.

Spinal cord injuries generally originate with a sudden and traumatic blow to the spine. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete and the amount of function the victim has is determined by the type and severity of the injury. For the victim of a spinal cord injury to suffer harm and potentially limited function, the spine does not have to be completely severed and usually is not. In addition to mobility and functional challenges commonly associated with spinal cord injuries, many victims of spinal cord injuries also suffer respiratory problems as a result of the injury. Some victims of spinal cord injuries will suffer limited function while others may suffer complete paralysis and permanent disability.

The improvement of emergency room care, as well as aggressive treatments of spinal cord injuries and rehabilitative treatment may all help victims who have suffered a spinal cord injury improve in some cases and regain limited abilities. For treatment of spinal cord injuries, rehabilitation includes physical, social and emotional support for victims. Various surgical interventions may also prove helpful to victims who have suffered spinal cord injuries.

Motorcyclists can suffer a variety of catastrophic injuries following a motorcycle accident, including spinal cord injuries. Because of the extensive physical, financial and emotional challenges motorcycle accident victims may suffer, legal options may be available to provide assistance with damages when victims have suffered harm due to another party’s negligence.

Source: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, “NINDS Spinal Cord Injury Information Page,” Accessed Jan. 26, 2015