Family members of car crash victims have legal options available that it may be beneficial to understand following an unexpected loss of a love one.

A 32-year old man from a neighboring community recently died in a car crash. According to the man’s sister, the victim was married with a 7-year old son and worked at a local auto shop. A small-sized SUV and the victim’s vehicle collided, resulting in the death of the victim at the hospital; the other driver was also taken to the hospital with what were noted as minor injuries. Authorities reported that the accident investigation was ongoing and that the cause of the accident was not presently known.

Those who have suffered a loss or injury as a result of a car accident may wonder what to do about medical or funeral expenses, and other damages, that are left following an auto accident. Both family members of loved ones lost in a car crash, as well as those injured in a car crash, have legal options available to help with the damages associated with a car accident. Surviving family members may be able to recover damages for medical and funeral expenses; loss of support and services; lost prospect of inheritance; and pain and suffering damages.

Depending on the individual characteristics of the victim, such as a young father who provides the primary financial support of the family, the damages will be evaluated and awarded. The negligent driver that caused the car accident, and oftentimes the negligent driver’s insurance company, may face liability to victims of a car crash. These parties may be required to provide compensation to the victim or victim’s family for damages suffered as a result of the car crash.

Those facing the weight of loss following a car accident should understand that legal options exist to help victims and families of victims. A trained personal injury attorney can work with victims and families of victims to help ensure appropriate compensation is received.

Source: Boston Herald, “Easton man, 32, dead in Stoughton car crash,” John Zaremba, et al., Dec. 31, 2013