Animal bites may leave victims facing physical and emotional pain.

A bicyclist riding in Boston was recently bitten by a dog that was not on a leash. The dog bite left the victim with a bloody leg. According to the police report, the victim reported that the dog was a medium-sized brown dog. The victim claimed that the pet owner told him that the dog had only “nipped” him and that the dog bite had not broken the skin. The dog’s owner provided her phone number to the victim and left the place where the incident occurred. Although the victim declined medical treatment, the police advised him to go to a local hospital. Police are attempting to contact the pet owner.

Thousands of people in the United States suffer animal bite injuries each year. The first thing that victims of a dog or animal attack should do is seek medical attention. The victim should also exchange contact information with the pet’s owner. Damages, including medical expenses, may be available via an animal bite claim. Compensation for medical expenses, lost wages, pain and suffering and property damage can be available to compensate victims, who make an animal bite claim.

Depending on the state, there are two types of liability pet owners can face. Some states hold pet owners strictly liable for animal bites, which means that, regardless of whether or not the owner was in the wrong in failing to protect others from an animal bite, the owner will be held “strictly liable” for any animal bite injury. This means that, even if the pet owner had no reason to know that that the animal might bite, the owner will still be held liable for injury or serious injury the animal causes. In other states, the owner will only face liability if the owner had reason to know of the animals “dangerous propensities.”

Compensation through a dog bite claim may be available to victims who have suffered injury. This relief may help with both the physical and emotional pain animal attack victims can be left with.

Source: Roslindale Patch, “Bicyclist Bitten Bloody by Unleashed Dog in Arnold Arboretum,” David Ertischek, Jan. 23, 2013